European Union Power – The Ideology of Anti-democratic Governance

I don’t often quote from the Bruges group, but here goes.

European Union Power
The Ideology of Anti-democratic Governance

This paper examines the nature of democracy and goes back to the fundamental principles, concepts and values which create democratic legitimacy and finds through analysis of the European Union that the EU cannot be described as a democratically legitimate organisation.

The European Union is a structure of political power existing and working above the level of the nation-state, the only body that allows democracy to function.


Click here to read the full analysis

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About IanPJ

Ian Parker-Joseph, former Leader of the Libertarian Party UK, who currently heads PDPS Internet Hosting and the Personal Deed Poll Services company, has been an IT industry professional for over 20 years, providing Business Consulting, Programme and Project Management, specialising in the recovery of Projects that have failed in a process driven world. Ian’s experience is not limited to the UK, and he has successfully delivered projects in the Middle East, Africa, US, Russia, Poland, France and Germany. Working within different cultures, Ian has occupied high profile roles within multi-nationals such as Nortel and Cable & Wireless. These experiences have given Ian an excellent insight into world events, and the way that they can shape our own national future. His extensive overseas experiences have made him all too aware of how the UK interacts with its near neighbours, its place in the Commonwealth, and how our nation fits into the wider world. He is determined to rebuild many of the friendships and commercial relationships with other nations that have been sadly neglected over the years, and would like to see greater energy and food security in these countries, for the benefit of all. Ian is a vocal advocate of small government, individual freedom, low taxation and a minimum of regulation. Ian believes deeply and passionately in freedom and independence in all areas of life, and is now bringing his professional experiences to bear in the world of politics.
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9 Responses to European Union Power – The Ideology of Anti-democratic Governance

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  3. tomsmith says:

    Do you support democratic governance?

    For me democratic/undemocratic is not the problem.

    • Sean O'Hare says:

      Democracy: Government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives

      What would be a problem for you then?

  4. jameshigham says:

    Yes, in line with what you posted earlier. We have all the means at our disposal to ignore Europe as an entity now but no one without the personal interest to continue it.

  5. Pingback: European Union Power – The Ideology of Anti-democratic Governance | Centurean2′s Weblog

  6. Vicky says:

    Came across this and thought it just might make you smile….
    http://occitan-democracyinaction.blogspot.com/
    Dear Member of Parliament…snippet

    The present Parliament is no better than Charles the First. It continuously introduces new taxes in all their guises. These are variously inheritance tax, tax on savings, tax as national insurance, tax as reduced allowances, tax on pensions, tax as V.A.T., tax as speeding and parking fines, tax as fuel tax, tax as licence and passport fees, tax as green tax, tax as congestion charge, tax as road fund, tax as T.V. licence and tax as crossing or motorway tolls. That list is by no means complete but it perfectly illustrates the tax-greed of a wastrel Parliament. Pitt the younger’s income tax was to be a temporary measure and was considered to be sufficient then to cover the expense of running both the government and the then anticipated war. In those days the traditional taxes on trade plus a half per cent rate of personal tax were enough to run everything plus a war. Nowadays those traditional taxes plus personal income tax of twenty per cent and all the new invented taxes which leech at our cost of living are apparently not enough to run a second rate country. Pitt was running an empire on a half a per cent tax rate and a small population tax base. Why can’t you run a small country with money left over when your tax rate is 20 per cent, the population tax base is huge, and you have created hundreds of new taxes? The answer is obvious. If a mountain of taxes is still not enough then our taxes are being wasted. This means they are being recklessly squandered by being spent on the wrong things.

  7. JPB Law says:

    It’s a long article so not quite sure I’ve taken it all in but my first impression is that the whole premise of the argument/essay is built on sand. That is to say the conflation of the democratic underpinning of EU institutions and their legitimacy. Political structures across the component member states of the EU show a far more and significant democratic deficit than this supranational body, and these should be the focus of our concern. It’s long been suggested that in the UK we have an elective dictatorship and I don’t know a time when the party in power has enjoyed a genuine mandate from the majority of the population and where we have had any input into the constituent members of our government. This seems of more concern.

  8. jpblaw says:

    JPB Law says: Apologies for the duplication. Please respond here.

    February 12, 2011 at 10:00 am

    It’s a long article so not quite sure I’ve taken it all in but my first impression is that the whole premise of the argument/essay is built on sand. That is to say the conflation of the democratic underpinning of EU institutions and their legitimacy. Political structures across the component member states of the EU show a far more and significant democratic deficit than this supranational body, and these should be the focus of our concern. It’s long been suggested that in the UK we have an elective dictatorship and I don’t know a time when the party in power has enjoyed a genuine mandate from the majority of the population and where we have had any input into the constituent members of our government. This seems of more concern.

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